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History Papendal

1959

24 January

The Dutch Sports Federation was founded. One of the topics that were addressed during a meeting of the Dutch Sports Federation (NSF) was how Dutch sports could become bigger. The idea for a national High Performance Centre from which all the affiliated sports federations of the NSF could profit was introduced.

1963

6 November

The plan for a national High Performance Centre was approved. The NSF bought woodlands from the City of Arnhem covering 93,5 hectares.

1965

The woodlands were expanded to 123 hectares.

1971

7 May

HRH Princess Beatrix opened High Performance Centre Papendal. At the opening, the grounds consisted of a main building with restaurant for 120 people, a sports hotel with 120 sleeping places, a large sports hall, a few grass pitches, a temporary centre for sports medicine, an athletics track with a synthetic top layer and a lab for scientific research of surfaces with and without grass.

1972

Construction baseball field.

1973

Construction driving range for golf and a special mini-golf course.

1976

Start of the gymnastics boarding school at Papendal. The gymnasts stayed in host families and went to school near the gymnastics boarding school.

1977

Arrival of the Central Institute for Sports Education (CIOS) to Papendal.

1979

Construction pool.

1980

21 June

The Olympics for disabled people took place in Arnhem. Part of the games took place at Papendal. On 21 June, HRH Princess Margriet opened the Olympics for disabled (currently known as the Paralympic Games).

1982

HRH Prince Claus opened the artificial pitch.

1982

HRH Prince Claus opened the meeting facility and the hotel.

 

1986

HRH Prince Bernhard unveiled a memorial plaque in Hotel Papendal, in memory of the British troops who lost their lives at Papendal during the airborne landings of the Battle of Arnhem (17 – 26 September 1944).

1987

25 August

Start ski boarding school of the Dutch Ski Association at Papendal.

1992

Closure of the gymnastics boarding school.

1993

7 May

The opening of a multifunctional congress and events location with a 3 star hotel (Hotel and Conference Centre Papendal) by HRH Prince Willem-Alexander.

1993

The NOC*NSF officially merged. Both organisations had settled at Papendal before. The Dutch Sports Federation (NSF) since 1989 and the Dutch Olympic Committee (NOC) since 1990.

1998

The former gymnastics hall was changed into a combat sports hall.

1998

Vitesse came to Papendal. With the opening of the GelreDome, the old training facility was closed down. Eventually, Vitesse ended up at Papendal.

2001

Following the Dutch successes at the Olympics in Sydney (2000), the NOC*NSF, in cooperation with the sports federations, developed a master plan for the future of Papendal as a national High Performance Centre.

2003

The master plan was approved in essence by the city and province.

2005

The red synthetic athletics track was renovated and provided with a new, blue top layer.

2005

Construction of the Pitch & Putt course Papendal.

2006

After the CIOS had decided to leave halfway during the nineties, they came back to Papendal in 2006 as part of the Rijn IJssel College.

2006

Realisation of the first semi-permanent sprint hall and the second weight training room.

2006

4 September

Start of the Handball Academy. More than twenty handball talents started to live, train and study at Papendal. Papendal started an intensive collaboration with the following LOOT schools: the Beekdal Lyceum in Arnhem, the College of Arnhem and Nijmegen and the Rijn IJssel College.

2006

19 September

The pool at Papendal was outdated and taken down. The pool made room for the Sports and Innovation centre which was opened later that year.

2007

Refurbishment of the restaurant of Hotel Papendal. The restaurant was renamed to Restaurant 2028. It used to be called Olympia and Sportiva.

2007

28 November

HRH Prince Willem-Alexander opened the Sports and Innovation centre. The Sports Medical Centre Papendal is one of the organisations that established themselves here.

2008

Realisation of the semi-permanent volleyball and badminton hall.

2009

Papendal officially received the CTO predicate. Centre for Elite Sports and Education (CTO) A centre where elite athletes live, train and study. With limited travel time.

2009

Opening of the wing with 4 star hotel rooms at Hotel Papendal.

2010

Realisation archery facility.

2010

29 October

The new Sports and Education building was put into service. The College of Arnhem and Nijmegen and the Rijn IJssel College started teaching classes in the building. Pim Mulier established itself here as well.

2011

25 March

Opening of the BMX track, an exact copy of the BMX track for the 2012 Olympics in London. For the best possible preparation for the Olympic BMX bike riders. At the time, the Olympic track in London had not even been built.

2011

Initial commissioning of the Sports hall west for practical classes of the CIOS and HAN, with a separate table tennis hall.

2012

The refurbishment of the Sports hotel was finished. More than 105 young talents have their own room at this hotel.

2012

3 November

High Performance Centre Papendal celebrated its 40-year anniversary spectacularly with the Papendal Sports Parade. It attracted more than 6,000 visitors including HRH Prince Willem-Alexander.

2012

14 December

Official opening of the Arnhem hall with the innovative Elite sports restaurant.
Have a look insight the Arnhem hall.

2013

1 January

Demerging of High Performance Centre Papendal from the NOC*NSF, private company High Performance Centre Papendal B.V. was founded.

2013

8 April

Vitesse opened its new training facility.

2015

8 July

Construction of Street Workout Park Papendal.

2016

1 January

Commissioning of the Sports Business Centre Papendal.

2016

Reconstruction of the BMX track in accordance with the design of the track for the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

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History